All thermal imaging can have a bad pixel. Pulsar's products have an integrated pixel repair feature.

Pixel Repair Made Easy—How to Fix a Bad Pixel

The popularity of thermal imaging and night vision devices has grown exponentially over the last five years as price points for these advanced optic systems have plummeted. Just four years ago, I looked at thermal imagers and found the baseline for a lower-grade device to hover around $3,500 – $4,000—the least expensive stand-alone thermal riflescope was a Pulsar Apex XD38A—and this was quite a while before I started handling media relations for Pulsar-USA.

(Click here to read that article published February 5, 2015.)

At the time I didn’t know much about thermal and night vision optics. Boy how things were about to change! While there are obvious differences, i.e. thermal Is not night vision, etc. actually running optics, especially devices produced by the same manufacturer, in this case, Pulsar, is similar. Remembering Pulsar thermal and digital night vision optics both feature a digitally displayed field of view, a perfect example is pixel repair.

All thermal imaging can have a bad pixel. Pulsar's products have an integrated pixel repair feature.
All thermal imaging can have a bad pixel. Pulsar’s products have an integrated pixel repair feature.

If you use a thermal imager or night vision device enough, it’ll happen—one day you’ll turn your optic on, peer into it and think, “what’s that spot on the screen?” That little spot is a bad pixel… a “dead spot” on the display. Far from a deal-breaker, losing pixels over time is simply part of the digitized optic landscape but it can be annoying. Fortunately, Pulsar thermal and night vision devices feature a tool aptly named Pixel Repair. As the name subtly eludes, this feature is specifically designed to repair… well, pixels. If you own a Pulsar thermal imaging or night vision device, follow these simple pixel-repair steps.

Step by Step:

  1. Power on the device.
  2. Long-press the menu “M” button.
  3. Using the up or down arrow button, scroll to menu page 2, annotated by highlighting the second dot (left to right) under the word “Menu” in the top-left corner of the display.
  4. Continue to scroll until an icon representing a “+” inside of a box is highlighted. The icon title “Defective Pixel Repair” will appear at the top of the display.
  5. Short-press the menu “M” button to select this icon.
  6. Move the up or down arrow button to highlight the same icon again (your choices are the Defective Pixel Repair icon or the Return icon.
  7. Short-press the menu “M” button to select this icon. This time, you’ll actually enter the Defective Pixel Repair administration screen.
  8. In this screen, you’ll note an “X” cursor, as well as a zoomed-in picture-in-picture representation of the “X” cursor area with an “X” cursor also in the cropped PiP window. Beneath the PiP window, X and Y axis values are represented (i.e., X=100 and Y=100). A left-side arrow points to the axis currently being adjusted and a directional icon lets you know whether the selected axis moves the “X” cursor horizontally or vertically. NOTE: X axis is for horizontal adjustments. Y axis is for vertical adjustments.
  9. The “X” cursor originates in the top left corner of the display. If X=0 and Y=0, the “X” cursor would be positioned in the top left corner of the display. Using the up-arrow button for either axis would move the “X” cursor to the right or down on the display. Understanding axis movement, continue to step 10.
  10. With the X axis selected, use your up or down arrow button to move the “X” cursor horizontally to align with the defective pixel.
  11. With the Y axis selected, use your up or down arrow button to move the “X” cursor vertically to align with the defective pixel.
  12. Toggle between X and Y axis and use up and down arrow keys to make final adjustments. Using the zoomed-in PiP area, ensure the bad pixel is at the center of the “X” cursor.
  13. Short-press the REC button to repair the pixel.
  14. “OK” appears in the PiP window. The pixel repair is complete. Continue until all pixel repairs have been made.
  15. Long-press the menu “M” button three times to step back to the device’s normal field of view. The annoying pixel should now be gone.

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